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Friday, September 27, 2019

Five updated things you didn't about North Pole

Recent Five North Pole's updates

North Pole

1. There are four North Pole. The terrestrial north pole is a fixed geographic point that is opposite the terrestrial south pole on the axis of rotation of our planet; It is the topmost earth of the spinning top.

2. The North Dip Pole is the place where the geomagnetic field is perpendicular to the Earth's surface, "dipping" to complete the large, rotating ellipse of our planet.

3. North dip pole is not constant. Over the last century, it has moved northward from a point in Canada at about 71 degrees latitude in its current position, about 85 degrees north in the Arctic Ocean.


4. There is also a southern dip pole, but the northern dip pole should not be opposed, or should be opposed. Right now they are more than 20 degrees latitude.

5. When your compass points north, it points to the north dip pole, also known as the magnetic north pole.

Unlike Antarctica, there is no land at the North Pole. Instead it is all ice floating over the Arctic Ocean. Over the past four decades, scientists have seen a decline in both the amount and thickness of Arctic sea ice during the summer and winter months.
Every year, data from these satellites helps ice analysts estimate the total sea ice extent as well as the difference between first year and multi-year ice. Multi-year ice is thick and survives in at least one melt season, while first-year ice is very thin. Arctic sea ice typically reaches its lowest level in mid-September each year. In 2018, the National Snow and Ice Data Center noted that this year's remaining multi-year snow was the sixth lowest on record.

North Pole is experiencing is fully darkness

From the beginning of October to the beginning of March, the North Pole experiences total darkness. So how do polar orbiting satellites still capture the imagination of the Arctic during that period?
This band is particularly useful for forecasting in Alaska because it allows them to see low-level clouds, sea ice, and ice during long nights of Arctic winters.
North Pole
Scientists captured this view of sea ice in the Kotzebue Sound on April 12, 2018, using the VIIRS Day/Night Band. (NWS Fairbanks)


Polar orbiting satellites observe different parts of the Arctic 14 times per day

Rotate the Earth 14 times each day from pole to pole as the planet rotates on its axis. The two satellites are separated by 50 minutes, which allows researchers to see ice moving in the Arctic using looped imagery.
North Pole
These two views of NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP show young snow moving horizontally in the Chukki Sea, northwest of Alaska. This imagery was taken using the satellite's VIIRS instrument on December 18, 2018, which is particularly useful as the region is currently experiencing polar nights. (Zol Torres / CIRA)

There’s no land at the North Pole

North Pole
Unlike Antarctica, there is no land at the North Pole. Instead it is all ice floating over the Arctic Ocean. Over the past four decades, scientists have seen a decline in both the amount and thickness of Arctic sea ice during the summer and winter months.

Knowing the wind speed over the North Pole is important for  weather forecasts



North Pole

There’s a difference between the North Pole and the Geomagnetic North Pole 


North Pole

This graphic shows the location of the North Magnetic Pole, Geographic North Pole and Geomagnetic North Pole in 2017. (Caveat)

Do you know that traveling to the North Pole possibly using a compass takes you north? Because of the difference between the geographic North Pole and the geomagnetic North Pole, which is the compass and that handy GPS app on your phone usage. Geomagnetic polls change over time, so what was geomagnetic in the North 10 years ago as it is not in 2018. In other words, trekking from Greenland to the North Pole is not the best idea if you are relying solely on a direction detector.

So, if you were planning to track Santa on this Christmas, perhaps leave it to the experts of the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). They have been tracking Santa's journey from the North Pole for over 60 years!

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